Five…Children’s books EVERYONE should read

Children’s books are pretty damn amazing, because they put a spin on the world, and deal with hard truths in ways which say that “dragons can be defeated”. They’re hopeful, even in the face of horror. I love children’s books. And by children’s, I’m saying anything from about five to thirteen, when Young Adult starts kicking in. There are children’s books that I think all adults should read, because they’re honest, even if they have fairies and goblins – much like children themselves.

Before I start, last week I mentioned at the end of once of my posts that I was knitting an aardvark – well, the aardvark is finished, and looks rather like something from The Clangers! But it’s cute. It’s amazing how different something can look through the addition of a pair of ears! So meet Clanger, he will be joining Bloonicorn in my bookstagram photos! Here they are, best buds already

I’m now embarking on an elephant, colour appropriate I’m afraid, as I’m making it for a present. I’ll post a few pictures of the elephant when it’s done!

Five children’s books EVERYONE should read.

Where I have recently reviewed the book listed, I have hyperlinked to my other posts, so you can find out more about Why You Should Read.

Five
A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness

Honestly, this book is heart-breaking, but absolutely necessary. It’s about a boy, who’s mother has advanced cancer. One night he is visited by a monster at his bedroom window, a monster who barters three stories in exchange for one truth. Please. Read this.

Four
His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman

It’s a series, and I debated whether I should include this or add it to the list of “the obvious” but the knowledge that not everyone has read the adventures of Lyra and Pan in their search for Dust in a parallel world is too much. The trilogy is intense, and it is incredible. I can’t recommend it enough, no matter how old you are.

Three
War Horse by Michael Morpurgo

Honestly, just anything by Morpurgo –Kensuke’s Kingdom, Butterfly Lion ect. His books are full of deep and emotional tales of unlikely and enduring friendships, and War Horse isn’t only an excellent book, it’s a fantastic film and an amazing play. Get a hat-trick and do all three.

Two 
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransome Riggs

… should probably come under YA. The protagonist is a teenager, but the story is about a home full of children with “peculiarities” who live in a time loop, children forever. They are children, and they are ancient – a juxtaposition that suits adulthood. It’s about being different, and accepting who you are and where you belong.

One
The Boy In the Striped Pyjamas by John Boyne

About a German boy in WWII, who is being bought up outside a concentration camp, who makes friends with one of the boys on the other side of the fence. It. Is. Heart-breaking. It’s a story of friendship, and childhood innocence, and packs more of a punch than many adult books I have read since.

Have you any others to add to the list? I skipped the obvious Harry Potter and Chronicles of Narnia. I think Inkheart should be on this list too, but it’s probably number six. And I loved The Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge, I’ve got A Skinful lof Shadows on my TBR shelf. Narrowing this list down to five was hard, but I’d like to hear what would have made your top five of children’s books everyone should read (not just kids).

3 Comments

    1. Just in general? I’ll admit the second book is a bit of a slog through blitz-ridden London, but I liked the idea and think it was executed quite well. I just liked the idea of being old and young simultaneously.

      Liked by 1 person

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